Hearing Loss in Thalassemic Children on Chelation Therapy

  • Ravi Kumar Parihar Jammu and Kashmir, India,
  • Kamal Kishore Jammu and Kashmir, India,
  • Anamika Bharti Jammu and Kashmir, India,
  • Sanjeev Kumar Digra Jammu and Kashmir, India,
  • Ghan Shyam Saini Jammu and Kashmir, India
Keywords: Blood transfusion, Iron chelation, Sensorineural hearing loss, Thalassemia

Abstract

Background: Thalassemia is a common genetic hematological disorder worldwide. It is also common in North India including Jammu region. These patients need lifelong repeated blood transfusions and iron chelation therapy for their survival. Chelation therapy is known to be associated with various complications including sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Till now, no data are available regarding SNHL in pediatric thalassemia major patients in Jammu region. Hence, we planned a study to assess the prevalence of hearing loss in children with thalassemia major in the age group of 10–20 years.
Methods: All the children with beta-thalassemia major in the age group of 10–20 years registered with Thalassemia Day Care Center, Department of Pediatrics, SMGS Hospital, Government Medical College, Jammu, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Hearing was assessed by pure tone audiometry. Clinical and demographic data of these patients were recorded on pretested pro forma and analyzed.
Results: A total number of 34 children with thalassemia in the age group of 10–20 years were enrolled in this study which comprised 18 males and 16 females. Out of these 34 patients, 5 (14.7%) were found to have SNHL and 1 (2.9%) had conductive hearing loss. Four of the five patients in SNHL group had low- as well as high-frequency mild hearing loss (25–40 db) while one patient had high-frequency mild hearing loss at 4000 HZ. Four out of these five patients had unilateral hearing loss on the left side while one had bilateral SNHL. Two out of five patients in the SNHL group were taking chelation therapy in the form of combination of deferiprone and deferasirox at the dose of 75–100 mg/kg/day and 30–40 mg/kg/day, respectively, for more than 5 years. The other three patients were taking only deferasirox at the dose of 30–40 mg/kg/day for more than 5 years.
Conclusions: Regular blood transfusions and chelation therapy are essential for long-term survival of thalassemia major patients but are also associated with complications like SNHL.

Author Biographies

Ravi Kumar Parihar, Jammu and Kashmir, India,

1Lecturer, Department of Pediatrics, SMGS Hospital, Government Medical College,

Kamal Kishore, Jammu and Kashmir, India,

2Associate Professor, Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, SMGS Hospital, Government Medical College, 

Anamika Bharti, Jammu and Kashmir, India,

3Post Graduate Student, Department of Pediatrics, SMGS Hospital, Government Medical College,

Sanjeev Kumar Digra, Jammu and Kashmir, India,

4Professor, Department of Pediatrics, SMGS Hospital, Government Medical College,

Ghan Shyam Saini, Jammu and Kashmir, India

5Professor, Department of Pediatrics, SMGS Hospital, Government Medical College,

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Published
2020-06-19