Relationship Between Cholesterol and Gallstones, is There Really a Link? A Review of 80 Cases

  • Naveen Alexander Associate Professor, Department of General Surgery
  • Rufus Ranjit Singh Edwin Junior Resident, Department of General Surgery
  • Prabhu Purushothaman Associate Professor, Department of General Surgery
  • Saravanan Sanniyasi Associate Professor, Department of General Surgery
Keywords: Cholelithiasis, Cholesterol, High-density lipoprotein, Low-density lipoprotein

Abstract

Background: Cholelithiasis or gallstones and symptomatic or incidental forms a major chunk of general surgical outpatient population, with laparoscopic cholecystectomy being a very commonly done procedure. Many risk factors have been associated with the development of gallstones. The authors study a possible link between gallstones and levels of the different components of cholesterol.
Objective: This study aims to identify and establish a positive link between gallstones and cholesterol by analyzing of lipid profile.
Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study done from October 2015 to August 2017 and included 80 patients with cholelithiasis or choledocholithiasis diagnosed through radiological studies. Fasting lipid profiles were done for all of them.
Results: A total of 80 patients were evaluated in this study. 12 patients had hypercholesterolemia contributing to 15% of the study population, equivalent to similar studies on general population. 23 patients (28.7%) had high triglyceride levels, equivalent to general population prevalence. 79/80 patients had a low high-density lipoproteins (HDLs), much higher than general prevalence of 72.3%, showing a strong correlation between gallstones and decreased HDL levels. 35/80 had high levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) (43.8%), compared to national level 11.8%, showing a strong correlation between gallstones and increased LDL.
Conclusion: With the above data, it was surprisingly proved that low HDL levels and high LDL levels played a more important role in the formation of gallstones. This is of more importance because serum LDL and HDL levels can be controlled by change of lifestyle and dietary patterns.

Author Biographies

Naveen Alexander, Associate Professor, Department of General Surgery

Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Rufus Ranjit Singh Edwin, Junior Resident, Department of General Surgery

Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Prabhu Purushothaman, Associate Professor, Department of General Surgery

Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Saravanan Sanniyasi, Associate Professor, Department of General Surgery

Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

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Published
2021-10-05