The Radix Entomolaris and Paramolaris: A Review and Case Reports with Clinical Implications

  • Rajkiran Chitumalla King Saud Abdulaziz University of Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Sheeba Khan College of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Buraydah Private Colleges, Qassim, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Kiran Halkai Ajman University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates
  • Rizwan Quresh Bhabha College of Dental Sciences, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
  • Rahul Halkai Ajman, United Arab Emirates
  • Swapna Munaga King Saud Abdulaziz University of Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Keywords: Additional third root, Permanent mandibular first molar, Radix entomolaris, Root canal anatomy

Abstract

Normally, the permanent mandibular first molar has two roots, mesial and distal. However, mandibular molars may have an additional root located either buccally (radix paramolaris) or lingually (radix entomolaris [RE]). Understanding of the presence of an additional root and its root canal, anatomy is essential for successful treatment outcome. The aim of this paper is to review the prevalence and morphology of RE and to present two cases of permanent mandibular first molars with an additional third root (RE) in the Indian population. In this study, we did a clinical investigation of two cases; one case of successful endodontic management of permanent mandibular first molar characterized as RE, whereas the second one is a presentation of a case of severe bone loss around permanent first molar with an additional third root. The presence of an additional third root in permanent mandibular first molars may affect the prognosis of the tooth if it is misdiagnosed. Thus, an accurate diagnosis and thorough understanding of variation in root canal anatomy are essential for treatment success.

Author Biographies

Rajkiran Chitumalla, King Saud Abdulaziz University of Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Department of Restorative and Prosthetic Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, College of Dentistry

Sheeba Khan, College of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Buraydah Private Colleges, Qassim, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Assistant Professor, Department of Restorative Dental Sciences, Division of Endodontics

Kiran Halkai, Ajman University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates

Faculty of Dentistry, College of Dentistry

Rizwan Quresh, Bhabha College of Dental Sciences, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

Assistant Professor, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics

Rahul Halkai, Ajman, United Arab Emirates

Specialist Endodontist

Swapna Munaga, King Saud Abdulaziz University of Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Department of Restorative and Prosthetic Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, College of Dentistry

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Published
2021-09-29